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[SOLVED] Business process in using OTM

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  • [SOLVED] Business process in using OTM

    Hi,

    My company is implementing OTM, I realised that there is no business process documents from Oracle which explains how the transaction is going to be performed thru OTM e.g. to create quotation, to create an Order, to bill customer and etc... Would someone pls help to shed some lights on this? Thanks for your help!

  • #2
    Re: Business process in using OTM

    OTM does not really have "standard" business processes. The way that the application is implemented is by designing your required business processes and then designing and configuring the integration, workflow and data that you need to support that.

    Of course, to do that well, you need a clear understanding of your required business processes (typically a role led by the client) and individuals who can understand those required business processes and design / configure the application accordingly (typically a role led by the OTM functional team).

    If you want to kick start your understanding of the application, my advice would be to first get to grips with the different objects (order base, order release, shipment, invoice, etc) and the relationship between them which is typically guided by automation agents.

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    • #3
      Re: Business process in using OTM

      OTM has always had a big gap around documentation on how to configure the application and how to use. We have began to build end user guides on how to process a order, build shipments, and also do tendering and execution. We also have built custom materials for how to implement OTM. This would include creating master data, rates, and how to load them.

      I see that you have mentioned Quote in your email. There is a series of issues logged with Oracle on how the Quote functionality works. Be sure you fully test it before releasing it to the end user community.
      Samuel Levin
      MavenWire

      www.MavenWire.com

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      • #4
        Re: Business process in using OTM

        Originally posted by bmj_23 View Post
        OTM does not really have "standard" business processes. The way that the application is implemented is by designing your required business processes and then designing and configuring the integration, workflow and data that you need to support that.

        Of course, to do that well, you need a clear understanding of your required business processes (typically a role led by the client) and individuals who can understand those required business processes and design / configure the application accordingly (typically a role led by the OTM functional team).

        If you want to kick start your understanding of the application, my advice would be to first get to grips with the different objects (order base, order release, shipment, invoice, etc) and the relationship between them which is typically guided by automation agents.
        Hi,

        We’ve also just started with design to implement OTM. I have been searching everywhere for business processes, but with no luck.

        I also have been told that there is no standard business processes by the SI and did not believe them. Then I stumbled across this forum and I again see the statement that there is none or that the documentation just does not exist.

        But surely there must be high level overviews of how OTM or G-Log is configured as a “vanilla” version and what most organizations believe to be best business practises. Doesn’t matter what logistics company you’re in – the process starts with a request from a customer to move cargo and the process ends with a delivery at a destination.

        OTM or G-Log has to have some sort of standard logic on how it handles the supply chain processes. Otherwise everybody ends up with a hugely customised version of the system that will be very difficult to maintain thru future upgrades and maintenance.

        Or am I wrong?

        So my question is where do I find this information?

        Regards

        Jacques

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        • #5
          Re: Business process in using OTM

          Hi Jacques - the first thing to say is that OTM is a very flexible application and at the lowest level of detail can be configured to do all sorts of things to suit a clients requirements. The second thing to say is that if someone says "Can OTM do .... ?" there are typically 2 or 3 ways of doing the "same" thing within the application.

          Therefore, from an implementation point of view:

          a) be very clear on your requirements and required business processes before you start with the software - it doesnt take long to do if you know what you want to do. If you are not in a position to document your low level requirements and processes (many clients are not), take the time to do that prior to doing anything with the technology

          b) Involve experienced OTM consultants in the above process and carry that forward in to the design stage of the solution. A good OTM consultant will provide a "blueprint" document which details the exact (low level) configuration required to meet your requirements. Make sure you have someone on your team that understands that document and "owns" that design.

          c) Once you have got the processes and requirements clear, configuring OTM should not take a huge amount of time if you have been clear on the requirements and design.

          Sorry for the long winded reply; the point is that because OTM is very flexible and can be configured in a number of different ways, there is no "standard" or "vanilla" processes as such. The software is configured for your individual requirements.

          If you are looking for an "overview" of "standard" processes - engage an experienced (2/3 years) OTM consultant who has done at least 2 full lifecycle implementations - they will be able to provide the guidance that you require to make sure that your project is successful including "best practice". if you have new and relatively inexperienced consultants, then, in my experience, you will struggle to get a holistic solution designed and configured.

          That will be the value add that you get when you engage with consultants that have done this many times before and can picture the required solution.

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          • #6
            Re: Business process in using OTM

            Hello Jacques,

            I completely agree with bmj_23. In addition, I'd like to say that one of the reasons for a lack of a documented "standard" process is that OTM has been utilized by a vast array of companies in order to solve very different problems - all rooted in logistics planning.

            At G-Log, we often built out new "core" functionality at the request of new clients in order to secure the business and also increase the OTM (then GC3) footprint. Good examples of this are the visibility and freight forwarding components, which were built out for specific clients (but of course made generic enough to apply to future clients' needs).

            As such, you'll find companies using OTM in very different ways -- most will use it for logistics planning, rating and execution (domestic and/ or international), some will use it strictly as a visibility system, some will use it strictly as a high-level transportation management solution, while using a different optimization engine. I found that the G-Log clients were so diverse, that it seemed that we were solving new issues with each implementation.

            Now that the product has matured and Oracle is pushing it more directly at a particular market segment, I believe that the usage of OTM will standardize somewhat. Unfortunately, the documentation and/or training materials have not caught up (something that we're working on internally).

            So ultimately, bmj_23's advice is best: find a consultant with several years of experience and at least 2 full lifecycle implementations (with happy clients!).

            Thanks!
            --Chris

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